An emotional response to a technical device – my wearables experience!

Emma-Church72

I am going to tell you about my experience wearing a wearable in the workplace. I know you are expecting to hear how I was reluctant at first, but then found out that my lifestyle habits improved…well no, that’s not what I’m going to say.

I reluctantly took part in the Profusion wearables trial back in February 2015. This was a ten day study to drive an understanding of human behaviour using different signals – tracking sleep, heart rate, locations, web browsing and emotions.

I feared I was too time poor to keep up with regularly answering emotional survey questions (I have two small children of one and four years old). Plus, the feeling of total exposure was subconsciously weighing me down even though everything was recorded anonymously. However, everyone else’s enthusiasm to be part of it plus the incentive of owning my own Fitbit device won me over.  Continue reading An emotional response to a technical device – my wearables experience!

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Making data science work for you

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Data science is undoubtedly a powerful tool for businesses. It promises to make them smarter, engage with their customers better, improve how staff are managed, increase sales and plan effectively for the future.

However, data science only has value if the insights that are gained are accurate and the right action is taken. Making the wrong assumptions, mistaking correlation for causation or becoming the victim of confoundedness (more on that later), will send a business down the wrong path, possibly with disastrous consequences. Continue reading Making data science work for you

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Smart Cities mean smarter marketing

Mike-WEST72

If the Internet age has taught us anything, it’s that where there is information, there is money to be made. With so much personal information available and countless ways to use it, businesses and authorities will be faced with a number of ethical questions.

In a fully “smart” city, every movement an individual makes can be tracked. The data will reveal where she works, how she commutes, her shopping habits, places she visits and her proximity to other people. You could argue that this sort of tracking already exists via various apps and on social-media platforms, or is held by public-transport companies and e-commerce sites. The difference is that with a smart city this data will be centralized and easy to access.

Continue reading Smart Cities mean smarter marketing

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Does the nothing box exist?


Karolina-Kruszewska72

This blog was inspired by George, one of the data scientists in my team. He has a perfect seat in the office, hidden in the corner behind a monitor where he can shut himself into his own data world. He calls himself a doer and he does great hard core data science. Some people call him George – half man – half desk as he is a very hardworking guy. He has all the stereotypical qualities of a man: clumsy, never stressed and unable to multitask. He drifts away into his data science world easily and as a result conversations and jokes often go over his head. This is all down to his devotion to statistics and knowledge for which we admire him. Continue reading Does the nothing box exist?

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Uniting physical and digital retail

Anthony Mullen

Consumers are demanding. Demanding better service from businesses, more personalised marketing, and more understanding from retailers of what they want and when they want it. This poses a problem for retailers that have both physical shops and online offerings. Today’s customer is increasingly expecting that the online offering and the bricks and mortar shop of a brand have the same understanding and knowledge of them. To make this happen, retailers need to be able to marry the data they gather in the physical and online world. Continue reading Uniting physical and digital retail

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What I think about data protection – a respectful rebuttal to Hasan Akyol

Richard-Harvey72I was, until last weekend, terrified of flying. The idea of getting into an aluminium can and being shot through the air into turbulence was something I thought would kill me. Fortunately, the staff at British Airways run a ‘Fly with Confidence’ course. It revealed to me something I didn’t realise about myself, I was anxious because I didn’t really know what was going on and I wanted to be in control. So when I read the blog “Should individuals be solely responsible for protecting their privacy and security online?”, penned by Hasan and Hassan, I had a feeling that maybe some of the argument was based on the same problem as my fear of flying – a fear of the unknown. Continue reading What I think about data protection – a respectful rebuttal to Hasan Akyol

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Should individuals be solely responsible for protecting their privacy and security online?

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The debate about online security has been going on for years. There’s a sliding scale which ranges from those who believe that keeping personal information private online is a personal responsibility and those that believe that companies have a duty of care to protect any data given to them. Seeing as we are a data science consultancy, data protection and privacy are something that are often discussed in the office we decided to let our Project Architects have a go at it.

Continue reading Should individuals be solely responsible for protecting their privacy and security online?

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What’s in store for wearables data and marketing?

Simon-Farthing72

There’s plenty of discussion on the brave new world that wearable devices offers marketers. Surprisingly, little solid research has been undertaken to test the limits of what information could be collected from consumers via these devices and used by marketers. Even less attention has been paid to how data science could be used to analyse this information and gain profound insights into consumer and employee behaviour. This combination of wearable data and data science opens a Pandora’s Box of ethical and strategic questions on how to balance consumer privacy with highly personal real-time messages. Continue reading What’s in store for wearables data and marketing?

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Here comes the data science bit…

Mike Weston

It is no secret that data science promises to make many aspects of supply chain management and procurement more efficient.

Much has been written about how data science techniques can improve automation, increase freight usages, track vehicles more accurately, enhance customer interactions and visibility, and help responses to external factors such as weather. But these improvements are only fully realised if businesses are aware of, and avoid, some very common problems that hamper the use of data science in procurement.

Continue reading Here comes the data science bit…

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